Not a mistletoe#1: not even a parasite

Viscum album – mistletoe – showing branching pattern

(the first of some blogs about mistletoe-themed plants)

The distinctive geometric branching of Viscum album, the classic mistletoe of legend, is one of its most distinguishing features. Each branch bifurcates once a year, creating an intricate pattern. Not all mistletoes have this property – for example the Phoradendron species used at Christmas in the US don’t – they look really quite ordinary, not like the European plant at all.

Mistletoe Cactus – Rhipsalis baccifera

But a few other plants do have a similar pattern – though they aren’t mistletoe. The best-known of these are, perhaps, species of Rhipsalis the so-called ‘Mistletoe Cacti’.

Mistletoe Cactus with fruit

There are about 35 species of Rhipsalis, all true cacti with leaves reduced to spines and thick photosynthetic stems, some flattened but some cylindrical.  It is the cylindrical-stemmed ones that are known as the mistletoe cacti as these stems, when they divide, seem to echo the growth of our mistletoe Viscum album.  Their fruits even look vaguely like mistletoe berries.

These are ‘jungle cacti’ from Central and South America, with several forms and species popular as house plants.  Some are quite ‘hairy’ with fine spines coating the stems but others are virtually spine free. One of the commonest seen is Rhipsalis baccifera which, in its baldest, most spine/hairless form, is quite distinctive.

Some other Rhipsalis species

They are easily grown from stem fragments, though these take a while to root.  Here (below) is my current specimen, grown from three tiny stem fragments I picked up from the ground underneath a neglected garden centre specimen some months ago (I know a bargain when I spot one!)

No flowers yet, so no berries, but it’s now growing rapidly so I hope for some soon next year…

 

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